Racel Williams

Mixed Use Project

Summary:

Lines of sight are important. They visually tie the two sides of a seam together. Boundaries do not only divide. They also join things together.
Located on the historical boundary of North Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia, my goal was to try to (re)sew two opposing communities–separated by economic/social/cultural/racial/historical barrier–together at their seam.

Contribution: I was the architect for this project and was inspired by the idea that North Avenue in Atlanta is a metaphor for the seam.
The result was a mixed-use development consisting of townhouses and apartments with a retail greenhouse.
Process: I did an extensive site analysis and conducted several site visits to get a better understanding of the neighborhood prior to sketching out ideas for the project.
Located on the historical boundary of North Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia, my goal was to try to (re)sew two opposing communities--separated by economic/social/cultural/racial/historical barrier--together at their seam. The one thing that connects the two sides is their views to one another. These views are connected by two points, community A’s viewpoint and community B’s viewpoint. These points automatically create a line (link) between the two points. Inherently, this line lives in an infinite number of planes--two of which belong parallel and perpendicular to the ground. In turn, the line serves as a connection, while the plane becomes the boundary. It is from here that I will try to explore the relationship of the seam, which inherently serves to divide and separate, through the use of planes and lines to create visible and implied boundaries.